Eight: Data types and Structure

There’s lots of data I want in my commonplace: likes, bookmarks, things I read, annotations, notes, quotes, watches, listens, etc. 

I implement them with Post Kinds Plugin to provide both structure, presentation, and context to most of my notes.

#HeyPresstoConf20


Each post can have its own category and tags for a variety of taxonomic and (most importantly) search purposes.

 

This post was originally published on Chris Aldrich

Hypothes.is annotations to WordPress via RSS

I created a video overview/walkthrough of how I take highlights and annotations on Hypothes.isHypothes.is and feed them through to my WordPress Website using RSS and IFTTT.com.

I suspect that a reasonable WordPress user could probably set up a free Hypothes.is account and use the RSS feed from it (something like https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username) to create an IFTTT.com recipe to post it as a public/draft to their WordPress website.

My version presented here has also been augmented by also using the Post Kinds Plugin to which I’ve manually added a custom annotation post type along with some CSS for the yellow highlight effect. These additional coding flourishes aren’t absolutely necessary for those who just want to own the data on their website.

If you want to get even fancier you could also do RSS to IFTTT to do a webhook post to an Micropub endpoint or custom code your own solution using their API. Lots of options are available, the most difficult part may be knowing that something like this could even be done.

This post was originally published on Chris Aldrich

SEVEN

Another plugin I love is Post Kinds Plugin (Classic editor only at present) which automatically parses URLs I want to reply to, like, bookmark, etc. and saves the reply context to my website which helps prevent context collapse. My commentary and notes then appear below it.

(I also use a plugin that saves the content of URLs on my site to the Internet Archive, so I can reference them there later if necessary.)

This post was originally published on Chris Aldrich

After several years of giving back no data, apparently YouTube has changed at least some of the markup and metadata on their site so that parsers are returning richer data now. I’m thrilled to see that as of this morning putting in traditional YouTube permalinks now allows the parser in David Shanske‘s awesome IndieWeb Post Kinds plugin to properly return the title, summary, site name, tags, and featured images from YouTube videos! If only they’d include an h-card to give back the author name, URL, and avatar…

Making watch posts for YouTube just got a whole lot easier!

This post was originally published on Chris Aldrich